Taking a Look into Jordan Spieth’s Golf Odds in the Majors

Posted by Daniel Strum on August 27, 2015 in

Given how well he’s been playing lately, it’s hard to remember sometimes for Golf betting fans that Jordan Spieth is only 22 years old. Given the fact that he won the Masters and the U.S. Open and wasn’t that far from winning the British Open and the PGA Championship, his run through the 2015 majors has definitely been a special year.

 Taking a Look into Jordan Spieth’s Golf Odds in the Majors

How Have Golf Betting Odds Favored Spieth?

What may be even more special, though, is the attitude with which Spieth approaches the game. On the Monday round at the British Open, Spieth did outplay Day (69 to 70), and even though they both did get left a shot away from the playoff, the rounds that Spieth put in were special. In that fourth round, Spieth had tallied a bogey on the Road Hole, and on that 18th hole he left his approach just short of the target, and then his ball ended up in that notorious fairway dungeon.

It was when he realized that his putt on the 18th green – the one that would have sent him into that playoff – was going to end up just to the left that he started thinking about what he could do at the PGA Championship.

Spieth isn’t the first player to come up just short at a major and then start saying the right things about the next major to come up on the calendar. However, Spieth is one of the few who have talked about competing well in the next major and then gone on to do it. In 1972, for example, Jack Nicklaus finished behind Lee Trevino in the British Open in heartbreaking fashion, and while Nicklaus oozed enthusiasm for the PGA Championship, he ended up settling for a tie for 13th, with a 75 in the second round being particularly unpleasant.

This is why seeing Spieth finish out of the top spot in the PGA Championship was a little bit of an upset. As Spieth told ESPN.com, “I realize we don’t get to play another event like this until April of next year. And that makes you think, ‘Wow, there are only a few of these, and they are precious, and you need to make the most of them.’ When I think of this being the last major of the year, it’s a little bit of a sad feeling because I really thoroughly enjoy playing in the majors.”

If Spieth had won three of the four majors, he would have joined Ben Hogan and Tiger Woods as the only men ever to win three major tournaments in one year in the Masters era. Spieth doesn’t have any interest in flaming out after one year, either. He realizes that careers are defined by the sum total of what you do, not by what you do in one amazing year.

Spieth did look a bit out of sorts at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, but he turned an awful approach into the bunker on the 18th into a hole-out for birdie, and while he didn’t win, he finished well ahead of Rory McIlroy – and took McIlroy’s #1 world ranking at the same time. Spieth is here to stay.