Jim Harbaugh @ Michigan and his NCAA Football Odds Future

Posted by Alex Murphy on Sunday,August 9, 2015 6:24, EST in

Jim Harbaugh has made history among online college football betting fans as a player and a coach over the years. After 14 seasons as a player representing six teams in the NFL, he earned a number of honorary selections and awards. He finished his playing career with a quarterback rating of 77.6, along with 26,288 passing yards and a 129–117 touchdown-interception ratio, paving the way for his much-talked about coaching career. And after making coaching stops, we recently saw him join the Michigan Wolverines following three seasons with the San Francisco 49ers. And whenever he goes, he leaves nothing but a trail of success following him.

Let’s Look at Jim Harbaugh @ Michigan and his NCAA Football Odds Future

For example, in his first season with the 49ers, Jim swam against the current to win the NFC West division title. In a season that everybody expected him to fail; he soared mightily to a 13–3, the second-best regular-season in the NFC. Mind you, this was the first time since 2002 the 49ers made it to the playoffs. In 2012, under his guidance, the team won the NFC West division title for a second year running. That year, the went on to beat the Atlanta Falcons 28–24 in the NFC Championship Game to progress to the Super Bowl XLVII, where the Niners were infamously beaten by the Ravens, coached by his brother John Harbaugh–the first time ever that two brothers had met as head coaches in the Super Bowl. In 2013, he led them to a 12–4, and a third consecutive appearance in the playoffs and NFC title game where they lost to the Seattle Seahawks. By doing so, he became the first coach to make three appearances in the Conference Championship game in his first three seasons.

Harbaugh’s Track Record

As he joins Michigan, Harbaugh comes with the pedigree of a successful player and coach, as is briefed below, giving him the impetus to be a success with the Wolverines.

Playing Years

• Indianapolis Colts Ring of Honor (2005)
• PFWA NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1995)
• UPI AFL-AFC Player of the Year (1995)
• UPI First-team All-Conference (1995)
• Pro Bowl (1995)
• Fiesta Bowl Champion (1986)
• Academic All-Big Ten (1986)
• Big Ten Player of the Year (1986)

Coaching Years

• 2× Pioneer League Champion (2005, 2006)
• NFC Champion (2012)
• AP NFL Coach of the Year (2011)
• Orange Bowl Champion (2011)
• Woody Hayes Trophy (2010)

The Michigan Call-up

After leading the 49ers to what was an average season finishing 8-8 and failing to reach the playoffs for the first time since he took over, the team announced that they were parting ways with Harbaugh. Two days after the announcement, the Michigan announced that Harbaugh would be taking over as the college football head coach, on December 30 2014. It may shock many that he chose college football over the NFL given his record, but we will have to wait and see how he fares on.

Is Harbaugh the Real Deal or a Product of Media Hype?

Questions have been lingering whether Jim Harbaugh is a true talent-developer and game-changer, or another hyped-up product from the media. Former head coach Brady Hoke was fired due to his lack of talent development–one major area that Harbaugh thrives on, as indicated by illustrious coaching résumé. While at San Diego, he turned an average team into a winning team, developing talents such as the quarterback Josh Johnson, who eclipsed the 3,000-yard mark twice and 70 touchdowns in two seasons.

Wide receiver Michael Gasperson, also developed under Harbaugh, completed 894 yards and 7 touchdowns in 2004. He went on to feature in the NFL for three years. Other players developed under Harbaugh include Eric Bakhtiari, John Matthews among other players like Alex Smith.

Of course, he has had his low moments, as every player and coach would, but based on his proven ability to transform teams, his homecoming to Michigan (a team he served diligently as a player) couldn’t be timed any better. And if he was able to transform the 49ers from a mediocre team to a championship-contending team in just a few years, doing the same in Michigan should be certainly possible, given some patience and time for him to get his house in order.