How Horseracing Quinella’s Work?

Posted by Eric Williams on Wednesday,April 12, 2017 10:35, EDT in

When you’re new to betting on thoroughbred horses and you want to know what a ‘quinella’ is, then consider your ticket punched! Let me get started by explaining what an exotic wager is in the thoroughbred horse racing betting industry.

Here’s A Closer Look At How Horseracing Quinella’s Work?

 

 

Exotic Wagers

An Exotic bet is any wager that is offered that is not straight wager. Exotic bets can often include a number of different horses or a number of different horses in a number of different races. There are two types of exotic wagers called a horizontal and vertical wager. The simplest explanation is that a horizontal wager is one that takes place within a single race. Vertical wagers are wagers that occur from race to race.

Now, before I move on to a quinella, I might as well explain what an exacta is since it’s kind of like a precursor to a quinella bet.

Exacta

An exacta bet is simply picking a pair of horses to win and place (first and second) in that order. For example, let’s say you like the 4 to win and the 6 to place in Race 5. You will then bet a 4, 6 exacta. If the 4 wins and the 6 finishes second, you win. In addition to that, much like a lottery ticket, you can also box an exacta, if you box the 4,6 exacta and the 6 finishes first and the 4 finishes second, you still win. A boxed exacta will cost twice the amount of a cold exacta because you’re making two separate bets, a 4,6 bet and 6,4 bet.

Quinella

The quinella is a wager that boxes an exacta like previously mentioned, but doesn’t double the cost. In a quinella, it doesn’t matter which horse finishes first or second. In the preceding example, you would win a 4,6 quinella wager whether the 4 or 6 horse came in first as long as the other horse that’s part of the quinella, the 4 or 6 finishes second.

Last but not least, you should know that quinella wagering isn’t quite as popular today as it was approximately twenty years ago as the vast majority of thoroughbred horse racing bettors prefer to bet on the exacta. Therefore, many tracks have stopped offering the quinella.